Project: Fluctuation-driven regime in spinal motor networks

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Description

When spinal circuits generate rhythmic movements it is important that the neuronal activity remains within stable bounds to avoid saturation and to preserve responsiveness. Here, we simultaneously record from hundreds of neurons in lumbar spinal circuits of turtles and establish the neuronal fraction that operates within either a ‘mean-driven’ or a ‘fluctuation–driven’ regime. Fluctuation-driven neurons have a ‘supralinear’ input-output curve, which enhances sensitivity, whereas the mean-driven regime reduces sensitivity. We find a rich diversity of firing rates across the neuronal population as reflected in a lognormal distribution and demonstrate that half of the neurons spend at least 50 % of the time in the ‘fluctuation–driven’ regime regardless of behavior. Because of the disparity in input–output properties for these two regimes, this fraction may reflect a fine trade–off between stability and sensitivity in order to maintain flexibility across behaviors.



Animals

Animal name

Investigator

Sessions

Animal actions

TurtleSubject1
Male, Red-eared Turtles, Red-eared slider
Wild type
Peter Petersen 2
TurtleSubject2
Male, Red-eared Turtles, Red-eared slider
Wild type
Peter Petersen 1

Sessions

Sessions

Animal name

Date

Subsessions

PeterP-2013-09-04
TurtleSubject1 September 4, 2013
PeterP-2013-09-04_006, PeterP-2013-09-04_007, PeterP-2013-09-04_008, PeterP-2013-09-04_009, PeterP-2013-09-04_010, PeterP-2013-09-04_011, PeterP-2013-09-04_012, PeterP-2013-09-04_013, PeterP-2013-09-04_014, PeterP-2013-09-04_015, PeterP-2013-09-04_016
PeterP-2014-03-27
TurtleSubject4 March 27, 2014
PeterP-2014-03-27_005, PeterP-2014-03-27_006, PeterP-2014-03-27_007, PeterP-2014-03-27_008, PeterP-2014-03-27_009, PeterP-2014-03-27_010, PeterP-2014-03-27_011, PeterP-2014-03-27_012, PeterP-2014-03-27_013, PeterP-2014-03-27_014, PeterP-2014-03-27_015, PeterP-2014-03-27_016, PeterP-2014-03-27_017, PeterP-2014-03-27_021, PeterP-2014-03-27_022, PeterP-2014-03-27_023, PeterP-2014-03-27_024, PeterP-2014-03-27_025, PeterP-2014-03-27_026, PeterP-2014-03-27_027, PeterP-2014-03-27_028, PeterP-2014-03-27_029, PeterP-2014-03-27_030
PeterP-2014-02-27
TurtleSubject3 February 27, 2014
PeterP-2014-02-27_007, PeterP-2014-02-27_008, PeterP-2014-02-27_009, PeterP-2014-02-27_010, PeterP-2014-02-27_011, PeterP-2014-02-27_012, PeterP-2014-02-27_013, PeterP-2014-02-27_014, PeterP-2014-02-27_015, PeterP-2014-02-27_016, PeterP-2014-02-27_017, PeterP-2014-02-27_018, PeterP-2014-02-27_019, PeterP-2014-02-27_028, PeterP-2014-02-27_029, PeterP-2014-02-27_030
PeterP-2013-10-10
TurtleSubject2 October 10, 2013
PeterP-2013-10-10_010, PeterP-2013-10-10_011, PeterP-2013-10-10_012, PeterP-2013-10-10_013, PeterP-2013-10-10_014, PeterP-2013-10-10_015, PeterP-2013-09-03_016, PeterP-2013-10-10_017, PeterP-2013-09-03_018, PeterP-2013-10-10_019, PeterP-2013-10-10_020, PeterP-2013-10-10_021, PeterP-2013-10-10_022, PeterP-2013-10-10_023, PeterP-2013-10-10_024, PeterP-2013-10-10_025, PeterP-2013-10-10_026, PeterP-2013-10-10_027, PeterP-2013-10-10_028
PeterP-2013-09-03
TurtleSubject1 September 3, 2013
PeterP-2013-09-03_008, PeterP-2013-09-03_009, PeterP-2013-09-03_010, PeterP-2013-09-03_011, PeterP-2013-09-03_012, PeterP-2013-09-03_013, PeterP-2013-09-03_014, PeterP-2013-09-03_015, PeterP-2013-09-03_016, PeterP-2013-09-03_017, PeterP-2013-09-03_018, PeterP-2013-09-03_019, PeterP-2013-09-03_020, PeterP-2013-09-03_021